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Holliday plays like an MVP -- as usual

Holliday plays like an MVP -- as usual

DENVER -- Matt Holliday's slide into home plate around Padres catcher Michael Barrett led to a celebration that lasted into the Rocky Mountain night, but Holliday joined the party late.

As the Rockies moved from home plate down the first-base line, Holliday was still on the ground dazed and confused.

"I don't even know what happened," Holliday said. "The umpire called me safe. That's all I know and then the guys were pounding on me. I don't even know. I don't even really remember what happened on the play."

Holliday's memory might be murky, but some postseason awards could be a refreshing reminder of his accomplishments. The slugger's final accomplishment -- scoring the game-winning run in the Rockies' 13-inning, 9-8 victory to put the Rockies in the postseason -- put the final touch on his MVP candidacy.

Holliday went 2-for-6 with two RBIs, securing the batting title with a .340 average and putting him at 137 RBIs, beating out the Phillies' Ryan Howard by one.

Holliday became the fifth player in the last 59 years to lead the National League in both batting average and RBIs. He also led the NL in hits (216), total bases (382), extra-base hits (92) and doubles (50) -- while adding one bruised chin.

"He's the MVP," shortstop Troy Tulowitzki said. "He's the best player in the league. Usually, the best players in the league come through in that situation, and he did."

Holliday had to come through against Padres closer Trevor Hoffman, against whom he had one hit against in 10 career at-bats. As the fans chanted 'M-V-P,' Holliday came up with Tulowitzki on second base, and he answered their chants with a triple off the right-field wall to tie the game.

"We've faced [Hoffman] enough," Holliday said. "We know what he's trying to do and he's great at it. He's great at what he does. For me, I'm trying to get a pitch I can drive before he gets to his changeup."

Holliday scored the winning run on Jamey Carroll's sac fly to right, bumping his chin and getting his hand stepped on.

As the postgame celebration moved from the field to the clubhouse, Holliday emerged late to the champagne-spraying party, blood on his chin and a glazed look on his face.

Holliday's glazed look quickly turned to a smile as Tulowitzki ran up and gave him a hug and a champagne shower.

"I've seen this on TV a lot and I'm excited to be part of it," Holliday said. "I've always wanted to spray whatever that stuff is all over the place."

C.J. Moore is an associate reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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