CLOSE

Now Commenting On:

Outman spearheads pitching effort in Rox win

Outman spearheads pitching effort in Rox win

Outman spearheads pitching effort in Rox win play video for Outman spearheads pitching effort in Rox win
DENVER -- Josh Outman was only supposed to throw 45-50 pitches Friday night. He was so good in the Rockies' eventual 13-3 win over the Dodgers that manager Jim Tracy let him throw 55.

Tracy gave Outman, a lefty specialist, first dibs at the starting spot vacated by Jamie Moyer. Moyer was designated for assignment Wednesday, leaving a hole in an already porous rotation. There was just one caveat: because Outman hadn't gone longer than one inning at any point in the year, there would be a strict pitch count until his arm got stretched out.

After his performance against the Dodgers -- in which he struck out five batters, allowed two hits and gave up no runs in 3 1/3 innings -- it's all but certain the Rockies will give his arm even more stretching.

More

"We have to be encouraged with Outman's start," Tracy said. "He did a solid job with what he had available."

Outman expects his next start to go longer, perhaps with a pitch count of 70.

"I'd love to go five or six innings, but that wasn't the smartest thing tonight," said Outman.

Because Outman didn't last five innings, he wasn't credited with the win. That went to Adam Ottavino (1-0), who struck out three batters in 1 2/3 innings. Ottavino entered the game in the sixth inning to replace Carlos Torres, who allowed two runs over two frames.

"Outman gave us a good start, got us the lead, and Torres held it down until the Dodgers broke it open," Ottavino said. "All I wanted to do was come in and put out the fire."

Tony Gwynn and Andre Ethier pegged Outman for two singles in the first inning, but that was as much trouble as he'd face all evening.

"I was a little nervous to get going, but after the first hitter it kind of wears off," Outman said. "[Gwynn] hit a single, so then I had to get things going and get out of the inning.

"Above all, I was comfortable. I've been groomed my entire career as a starter. Obviously, the need for the team coming out of Spring Training was for me to be a reliever, and I did my best to execute my role. But this is where I've felt I'll have my greatest success."

Trey Scott is an associate reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

Less
{}
{}